November 14, 2007, 9:19 pm

Change of Shift: Vol. 2, Number 11

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Welcome to Change of Shift, the best of the nursing blogosphere!

Before we get started, I shall engage in a bit of shameless self-promotion! Tonight Dr. Anonymous will be interviewing me on BlogTalkRadio, and I have no idea what the topics will be! Should be fun, but I’ll have stage fright even though I’m talking from my bedroom!

Then, for those of you who read “Fitness” magazine, there is an article in the December issue on staying healthy and I’m quoted in it! I’m as far from a Fitness cover model as you will ever get, but I know how to stop the spread of bacteria!

Enough about me, time to get to our submissions!

*****

Keith at Digital Doorway is taking a sabbatical from work/nursing and muses on what the next weeks will hold in Taking Leave: Exit Stage Left. He also introduces us to the concept of “Vicarious Traumatization”. Most interesting, and I wish him well on his search for balance, rest and self-renewal

We all have to deal with death eventually, but few of us have to deal with on our very first day. Our student nurse at Brain Scramble gets some experience in exactly that, as detailed in her Change of Shift submission: An Unforgettable First Clinical Day.

Beth at Pixel RN has some great suggestions in the post 5 Websites to Help You Survive Nursing School, but you don’t have to be a nursing student to take advantage of them. In fact, I’ll be checking out the Medline drug information site, myself!

*****

Sometimes we feel so overwhelmed with emotion it’s hard to even move. Flight nurse Emily presents a poignant story of courage and letting go in Mourning posted at crzegrl.net. Kleenex alert!

(Whoa! Lost on the Floor not only has a new template, but a new home on WordPress!) There’s a saying in the ER: The longer you stay, the longer you stay (trust me!). ER isn’t the only unit with issues. What do you do when the patient really doesn’t need Intensive Care, but the doctor says “Go!”? Check out Inappropriate ICU Transfer of the Week. (PS: interesting link at the bottom. No more Coke for me!)

Patients can’t tell what they look like, but they are there when we are at our most vulnerable. Terry, our resident nurse anesthetist at Counting Sheep discusses how you can communicate Behind the Mask. Terry also hosted Grand Rounds a couple of weeks ago, be sure to check it out if you missed it!

*****

I have absolutely nothing to add to this post except to say I wish I had written it. Madness, Tales of an Emergency Room Nurse introduces us to the inhabitants of that very special place: the ER waiting room in The ER Waiting Room is a Jungle. Oh, I will add that Burger King seems to be the preferred dining experience in my ER.

Dang! Ever wonder what a severe allergic reaction feels like from the other side of the gurney? Unfortunately, Azygos found out and recounts the frightening adventure in Angioedema. The culprit? Lisinopril, which I started taking a week ago. Greaaaat….

Still got your Kleenex nearby? Good, you are going to need it. ER Nursey uses a short post to say a million words in Watching Mama Die.

*****

Perspective. Julia develops it as she cares for a young man in A Lesson in Fairness, posted at her blog This Won’t Hurt a bit.

Every now and then, a submission comes into Change of Shift that is not nurse-related, but is something nurses can relate to. Meet Kal, a medic in England and writer of the blog Trauma Queen. He recalls one particularly difficult call in Enter the Dragon. Restock the Kleenex.

Tired of bedside nursing? If you have considered a career in clinical research, check out Kate’s post at Alternative Nursing Careers! And no, you don’t need your PhD to be a clinical research assistant!

*****

Katherine at My Midlife Nursing School Adventure wonders how we expect our patients to keep up with new developments when concepts change (and then change back) so quickly. She tackles this topic in Turn and Face the Strange.

Ever gone into work and found yourself sicker than the patients? Mother Jones tackles our penchant for showing up sick in Dead Nurse Walking, posted at Nurse Ratched’s Place.

Caring comes in all forms and it doesn’t always have to come from a nurse. Fellow yarn fanatic Alison tells a tale of knitting needles, ESP and breast cancer in Marguerite. You can find Alison at her blog, SpinDyeKnit. I’m happy to include this post in Change of Shift for Alison!

******************************

That concludes this edition of Change of Shift! I have some host bloggers lining up but I’m still confirming! So, for now you can send all submission for the next edition to me using Blog Carnival or the contact button up top.

Thanks to all who submitted and to all who are reading!

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15 Comments

  • AlisonH
    AlisonH

    November 14, 2007 at 11:34 pm

    I dunno about ESP; it was one of those things that just happens and you come away going, wow: I don’t get it, but I’m grateful that part came out how it did.


  • Change of Shift « Lost on the Floor
    Change of Shift « Lost on the Floor

    November 15, 2007 at 6:30 am

    [...] of Shift Posted on November 15, 2007 by Wanderer New Change of Shift is up over at Kim’s place.  Go check it [...]


  • [...] should pop on over to Emergiblog and check out the latest edition of Change of Shift. It’s a highly enjoyable carnival of nursing blog posts from the past few weeks, including [...]


  • [...] Change of Shift, the nursing blog carnival is up at Emergiblog. +del.icio.us +Digg it [...]


  • Counting Sheep » Blog Archive » Must-sees
    Counting Sheep » Blog Archive » Must-sees

    November 15, 2007 at 1:28 pm

    [...]  Change of Shift is up at Emergiblog – you get to read some of the best writing in the nursing blog world. Thank you, Kim, for my inclusion. [...]


  • [...] Change of Shift is up at emergiblog. I finally got off my ass and submitted this time . . . [...]


  • Robert at Kintropy
    Robert at Kintropy

    November 18, 2007 at 3:16 am

    Nice job, Kim. I like your commentary. I’m sure I’ll enjoy reading the blogs you’ve highlighted.


  • [...] Change of shift: vol. 2, number 11 Welcome to Change of Shift, the best of the nursing blogosphere! Before we get started, I shall engage in a bit of shameless self-promotion! Tonight Dr. Anonymous will be interviewing me on BlogTalkRadio, and I have no idea what the topics will be! Should be fun, but I’ll have stage fright even though I’m talking from my bedroom! Then, for those of you who read “Fitness” magazine, there is an article in the December issue on staying healthy and I’m quoted in it! I’m as far from a Fitness cover model as you will ever get, but I know how to stop the spread of bacteria! Enough about me, time to get to our submissions! ***** Keith at Digital Doorway is taking a sabbatical from work/nursing and muses on what the next weeks will hold in Taking Leave: Exit Stage Left. He also introduces us to the concept of “Vicarious Traumatization”. Most interesting, and I wish him well on his search for balance, rest and self-renewal We all have to deal with death eventually, but few of us have to deal with on our very first day. Our student nurse at Brain Scramble gets some experience in exactly that, as detailed in her Change of Shift submission: An Unforgettable First Clinical Day. Beth at Pixel RN has some great suggestions in the post 5 Websites to Help You Survive Nursing School, but you don’t have to be a nursing student to take advantage of them. In fact, I’ll be checking out the Medline drug information site, myself! ***** Sometimes we feel so overwhelmed with emotion it’s hard to even move. Flight nurse Emily presents a poignant story of courage and letting go in Mourning posted at crzegrl.net. Kleenex alert! (Whoa! Lost on the Floor not only has a new template, but a new home on WordPress!) There’s a saying in the ER: The longer you stay, the longer you stay (trust me!). ER isn’t the only unit with issues. What do you do when the patient really doesn’t need Intensive Care, but the doctor says “Go!”? Check out Inappropriate ICU Transfer of the Week. (PS: interesting link at the bottom. No more Coke for me!) Patients can’t tell what they look like, but they are there when we are at our most vulnerable. Terry, our resident nurse anesthetist at Counting Sheep discusses how you can communicate Behind the Mask. Terry also hosted Grand Rounds a couple of weeks ago, be sure to check it out if you missed it! ***** I have absolutely nothing to add to this post except to say I wish I had written it. Madness, Tales of an Emergency Room Nurse introduces us to the inhabitants of that very special place: the ER waiting room in The ER Waiting Room is a Jungle. Oh, I will add that Burger King seems to be the preferred dining experience in my ER. Dang! Ever wonder what a severe allergic reaction feels like from the other side of the gurney? Unfortunately, Azygos found out and recounts the frightening adventure in Angioedema. The culprit? Lisinopril, which I started taking a week ago. Greaaaat…. Still got your Kleenex nearby? Good, you are going to need it. ER Nursey uses a short post to say a million words in Watching Mama Die. ***** Perspective. Julia develops it as she cares for a young man in A Lesson in Fairness, posted at her blog This Won’t Hurt a bit. Every now and then, a submission comes into Change of Shift that is not nurse-related, but is something nurses can relate to. Meet Kal, a medic in England and writer of the blog Trauma Queen. He recalls one particularly difficult call in Enter the Dragon. Restock the Kleenex. Tired of bedside nursing? If you have considered a career in clinical research, check out Kate’s post at Alternative Nursing Careers! And no, you don’t need your PhD to be a clinical research assistant! ***** Katherine at My Midlife Nursing School Adventure wonders how we expect our patients to keep up with new developments when concepts change (and then change back) so quickly. She tackles this topic in Turn and Face the Strange. Ever gone into work and found yourself sicker than the patients? Mother Jones tackles our penchant for showing up sick in Dead Nurse Walking, posted at Nurse Ratched’s Place. Caring comes in all forms and it doesn’t always have to come from a nurse. Fellow yarn fanatic Alison tells a tale of knitting needles, ESP and breast cancer in Marguerite. You can find Alison at her blog, SpinDyeKnit. I’m happy to include this post in Change of Shift for Alison! ****************************** That concludes this edition of Change of Shift! I have some host bloggers lining up but I’m still confirming! So, for now you can send all submission for the next edition to me using Blog Carnival or the contact button up top. Thanks to all who submitted and to all who are reading! (Source: Emergiblog) [...]


  • [...] Change of shift: vol. 2, number 11 Welcome to Change of Shift, the best of the nursing blogosphere! Before we get started, I shall engage in a bit of shameless self-promotion! Tonight Dr. Anonymous will be interviewing me on BlogTalkRadio, and I have no idea what the topics will be! Should be fun, but I’ll have stage fright even though I’m talking from my bedroom! Then, for those of you who read “Fitness” magazine, there is an article in the December issue on staying healthy and I’m quoted in it! I’m as far from a Fitness cover model as you will ever get, but I know how to stop the spread of bacteria! Enough about me, time to get to our submissions! ***** Keith at Digital Doorway is taking a sabbatical from work/nursing and muses on what the next weeks will hold in Taking Leave: Exit Stage Left. He also introduces us to the concept of “Vicarious Traumatization”. Most interesting, and I wish him well on his search for balance, rest and self-renewal We all have to deal with death eventually, but few of us have to deal with on our very first day. Our student nurse at Brain Scramble gets some experience in exactly that, as detailed in her Change of Shift submission: An Unforgettable First Clinical Day. Beth at Pixel RN has some great suggestions in the post 5 Websites to Help You Survive Nursing School, but you don’t have to be a nursing student to take advantage of them. In fact, I’ll be checking out the Medline drug information site, myself! ***** Sometimes we feel so overwhelmed with emotion it’s hard to even move. Flight nurse Emily presents a poignant story of courage and letting go in Mourning posted at crzegrl.net. Kleenex alert! (Whoa! Lost on the Floor not only has a new template, but a new home on WordPress!) There’s a saying in the ER: The longer you stay, the longer you stay (trust me!). ER isn’t the only unit with issues. What do you do when the patient really doesn’t need Intensive Care, but the doctor says “Go!”? Check out Inappropriate ICU Transfer of the Week. (PS: interesting link at the bottom. No more Coke for me!) Patients can’t tell what they look like, but they are there when we are at our most vulnerable. Terry, our resident nurse anesthetist at Counting Sheep discusses how you can communicate Behind the Mask. Terry also hosted Grand Rounds a couple of weeks ago, be sure to check it out if you missed it! ***** I have absolutely nothing to add to this post except to say I wish I had written it. Madness, Tales of an Emergency Room Nurse introduces us to the inhabitants of that very special place: the ER waiting room in The ER Waiting Room is a Jungle. Oh, I will add that Burger King seems to be the preferred dining experience in my ER. Dang! Ever wonder what a severe allergic reaction feels like from the other side of the gurney? Unfortunately, Azygos found out and recounts the frightening adventure in Angioedema. The culprit? Lisinopril, which I started taking a week ago. Greaaaat…. Still got your Kleenex nearby? Good, you are going to need it. ER Nursey uses a short post to say a million words in Watching Mama Die. ***** Perspective. Julia develops it as she cares for a young man in A Lesson in Fairness, posted at her blog This Won’t Hurt a bit. Every now and then, a submission comes into Change of Shift that is not nurse-related, but is something nurses can relate to. Meet Kal, a medic in England and writer of the blog Trauma Queen. He recalls one particularly difficult call in Enter the Dragon. Restock the Kleenex. Tired of bedside nursing? If you have considered a career in clinical research, check out Kate’s post at Alternative Nursing Careers! And no, you don’t need your PhD to be a clinical research assistant! ***** Katherine at My Midlife Nursing School Adventure wonders how we expect our patients to keep up with new developments when concepts change (and then change back) so quickly. She tackles this topic in Turn and Face the Strange. Ever gone into work and found yourself sicker than the patients? Mother Jones tackles our penchant for showing up sick in Dead Nurse Walking, posted at Nurse Ratched’s Place. Caring comes in all forms and it doesn’t always have to come from a nurse. Fellow yarn fanatic Alison tells a tale of knitting needles, ESP and breast cancer in Marguerite. You can find Alison at her blog, SpinDyeKnit. I’m happy to include this post in Change of Shift for Alison! ****************************** That concludes this edition of Change of Shift! I have some host bloggers lining up but I’m still confirming! So, for now you can send all submission for the next edition to me using Blog Carnival or the contact button up top. Thanks to all who submitted and to all who are reading! (Source: Emergiblog) [...]


  • angioedema
    angioedema

    February 28, 2008 at 11:40 am

    [...] at treating a potentially fatal genetic disorder called hereditary angioedema. …www.chron.comChange of Shift: Vol. 2, Number 11 Welcome to Change of Shift, the best of the nursing blogosphere! Before we get started, I shall [...]


  • örgü
    örgü

    March 9, 2008 at 1:22 pm

    good thanks for sharing


  • bilim adamları
    bilim adamları

    March 23, 2008 at 11:18 am

    thanks for sharing.regards..


  • vicarious traumatization
    vicarious traumatization

    April 9, 2008 at 11:11 pm

    [...] referred to as compassion fatigue, contact the following …http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/ovc/help/vt.htmChange of Shift: Vol. 2, Number 11 Welcome to Change of Shift, the best of the nursing blogosphere! Before we get started, I shall [...]


  • Şarkı Dinle
    Şarkı Dinle

    May 9, 2008 at 4:40 am

    ohh thanks for sharing it s beautiful


  • [...] Change of Shift: Vol. 2, Number 11 [...]


About Me

My name is Kim, and I'm a nurse in the San Francisco Bay area. I've been a nurse for 33 years; I graduated in 1978 with my ADN. My experience is predominately Emergency and Critical Care, and I have also worked in Psychiatry and Pediatrics. I made the decision to be a nurse back in 1966 at the age of nine...

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